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20140426
20140504
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Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
to say germany was surrounded by friends and everything is wonderful. obviously we need to take a fresh look because o'land is our immediate neighbor, part of our club, our union, and pole -- pollland has a bored irwith ukraine and if there's chaos in ukraine and beyond it affects our very own security and that of all of nate at the and the i as well. so, yes, i think there must be a comprehensive review of our priorities, both in the e.u. and in nato, but let's not do it, if i may say so with foaming at the mouth. let's do it cool, and let's do it also, always, in -- with having in mind consistency. >> on that thought we're going to questions from the audience. if you just briefly give your name and affiliation. you know the rule, a question, not a statement. >> thank you. from george washington university. we talked about in april of 2008 the nato summit decided to not extend membership action to ukraine and georgia, and within four months georgia was invaded. with hindsight, the word wisdom has been subpoena number of times today. is it your view that things in -- not to extend prote
repeatedly. we were promised that after germany's unification than it would not spread eastward. a started expanding and incorporating former warsaw treaty countries. we heard in response this does not concern you. nations and countries have the war to choose the way of ensuring the security. that's true, but it's also true when the infrastructure of the military bloc approaches our borders we have grounds for apprehension question. no one could deny as this right. he went on to say have been no and western leaders have long many times tsongas, made decisions behind the back of price wars and accomplished fact some today we want to examine whether in natal and the newly expanded nato alliance is now reaping the whirlwind of that decision and the ukraine. the of a very distinguished panel of people here today who are essentially present at the creation in one way or another. you will have biographies, but briefly the former foreign minister and actually first prime minister and then foreign minister of poland, going to make the your first name. on my immediate left, prime minister of poland
in germany with hitler? an ableonsidered manager. that is basically what happened. that is basically the root of the problem today with the theine that is part of russian establishment. do you know what happened? 1994, russian elite, the ruling class, those who benefited the most and privatized the results of the --ocratic revolution of 1991 i haven't seen any of those in the so-called white house in augustthe coup 1991. they were quick to privatize the and gasw from the oil experts, which is still the basic economy. amazing the russian onte today is mostly based -- that is the answer to the question. russian elite to enable, theleft russia to post-soviet propaganda that is what it is today. >> [inaudible] [laughter] >> it is very painful for me to say these things. nd disappointed but did you think this would be a back door way? this would morph into an to nato pathway membership even though at the time it was painted in a different fashion? >> i will be frank. at this moment, we are very disappointed. the -- fourhat was nato membership, for the first time, and member of the polish governmen
at the woodrow wilson center they hosted a discussion on ukraine with former diplomats from germany, russia, and poland. they also heard today from chuck hagel. margaret warner moderated the discussion. . harmon and secretary hagel iterated this morning, i would remind you we are here to look at really 20 years ago at this fateful decision was taken in january of 1994 which was at it to offer a partnership for peace to russia, warsaw pactwer states. any on this panel i will at thece in this panel, time, the czech republic and hungary were clamoring for an nato membership. this was a compromise suggested by the administration. beginning in 1997, nato started thosembership first to three countries, and today it is 12 countries among larger than it was, the 16 members at the time. this obviously sticks in president putin's craw. in his telethon, i do not know how many of you watched this, he talked about it repeatedly. he said we were promised after germany's unification, nato would not spread eastward. when we said why are you doing this, we hurt in response this does not concern you. nations
it repeatedly saying we were promised after germany's unification nato wouldn't expand eastward but they started expanding and taking warsaw treaty countries. when we said why are you doing this we heard this doesn't concern you nations and countries have the right to chose their own security. and he said that is true. but whether the infrastructure of military blocks or approaches our borders we must take concern steps and no one can deny this. he said nato and leaders lied many times and placed before him an accomplished fact and that is what happened with nato expansion. tonight we want to examine whether nato and the expanded nato alliance is reaping the worldwind of the decision in ukraine. we have a panel here of people who were present at the creation in one way or another. the former minister and then -- or first prime minister and then former minister of poland here and i will butcher your name. he was the prim minister in '87 when they were first invited to join. next is the foreign minister at the waning base of the soviet union and 1991-1996 of russia and was involved in this drama.
exports gas into the eu the first country of transit let's say germany or ukraine or other eu countries, could not say, they couldn't dictate you may not pass this on without my permission to another country. what it allowed it to do the minute the gas comes into the eu it is not eu gas and to be transferred for the. as we talked before about reversing the clothes from poland hungary to slovakia into ukraine that would not impossible in 2009 because of the regular structure that was in place. by working with europe to get the regulatory structure their making some investments, getting them to make investments in infrastructure their less reliant today. but as russia will continue to be a supplier into europe there's more we can do together to make sure that reliance is diminished, and quite significantly. >> is a pipe dream for americans to see themselves in anything like the near future providing natural gas to europe and with that have any effect on our domestic market? or do we have so much that it would simply mean a new market and a new perhaps reduction in the trade imbalance if w
has put up for sale and includes other allergy medication such as claritin. reports say germany's buyer is closing in on a deal to buy the unit for about $14 billion. on wednesday, another possible bidder, said it was no longer in the running. they could announce the transaction in the next few days. shares in frankfurt at this hour, they're trading up, a bit over 1% at the moment. back to you. >> bertha, thanks for that. good to see you. >> you, too. >> thank you. >>> in earnings news, linkedin reported a net loss. excluding items, the professional social networking site beat analyst forecasts as revenue rose 46%. membership rose 7%, the same growth rate as the fourth quarter. linkedin is forecasting full-year revenue growth below analyst estimates. shares in linkedin today currently up, 4% in frankfurt. they were down heavily after hours in the united states. >>> kraft foods has reported higher first quarter profits helped by cost cuts and moves to manage prices for key ingredients. revenue fell which missed analysts forecasts. kraft will be raising prices for nearly half of i
it will be able to cope. we are seeing the beginning of next year, europe's richest economy, germany, so far without a national minimum wage is going to introduce one. it's about $12 an hour. that's under political pressure. we all know switzerland is a rich country. that's going to hold referendum to decide whether or not to introduce minimum wage of its own, $25 an hour. >> wow. interesting. great stuff from you. we'll talk to you soon. our own joining us from our newsroom. one more story for you on the labor day reforms. late wednesday, the brazilian president announced the move toward lower taxes for workers and 10% hike for poor. the the announcement comes as a popularity as all this five months before elections. okay. let's talk about this. see these babies laying around here. take a look. you may not see them again. going to talk about a sticky dispute. the indian alfonzo mango known as king of fruit. from today, they are banned. no more from the european union. authorities in brussels found consignments were infested with fruit flies. india says we've fix had the problem. the price h
. very different in structures like germany and france. doesn't belong in the sing currency in my opinion. whether it joined the european union is the question. there's plenty to game. membership in the single market, it's a huge positive, particularly when you open up markets with trade and investment. that's been the anchor for growth in places like poland and the czech republic. the institutional reforms that need to join the european union are important. these are countries that net beneficiaries in a fiscal sense. they have huge structural funds flowing to these countries in order to facilitate the catch up growth. >> the new members of the eu, how long before they join the euro? because it's implied that when you join the eu now, you also at some point will enter single currency. >> the uk has an appetite. the new members don't. so it is implicit within the terms of the succession that they will at some point -- yet to be determined -- join a single currency. that's the key point, the events of the past two or three years has an appetite for entry into the single currency. czech, hu
-mobile is the fourth-largest carrier in the state. it is owned by deutsche telekom in germany. it is a separate company in the states. when at&t try to buy it. wall street thought it would go through. it was price in. and the regulator said no. softbank need to get regulatory approval. the need to make the case this will not harm consumers. it will give consumers more options. >> so hans, who might run the company? >> john leger. the leading candidate. he is the current ceo and president of t-mobile usa. he is the leading candidate. deutsche telekom and softbank are talking about potential names. this is not a done deal. john leger a colorful figure. we have colors of him -- p ictures of him crashing and at&t consumer electronic show. if he's head of this new company, maybe he can get into mclemore parties by by himself. >> you see him with the pink t-shirt. hans nichols with the very latest possible merger. still with us for more of his views on the markets, the global seed investment officer -- global investment officer. before the break, we were talking about what you like in the markets. you are qu
will be gone, it meant when russian exports gas into the e.u., the first country of transit, germany, ukraine or other e.u. countries, they cooperate dictate you may not pass this on without my permission to another country. what it allowed it to do, the minute the gas comes into the e.u., it is now e.u. gas and can be transferred further. when we talked earlier about reversing the flows into ukraine, that would not have been possible in 2009 because of the regulatory structure that was in place. so by working with them to get the regulatory structure there, they are less relipet today. but as russia will continue to be a supplier into europe, there is more we can do together to make sure that reliance is diminished, and quite significantly. >> forgive the pun, but? is it a pipe dream for americans to see themselves in anything like the near future providing natural gas to europe, and would that have any effect on our domestic market? or do we have so much that it would simply mean a new market and a new perhaps reduction in the trade imbalance if we were able to do that. >> i think the unite
exports gas into the eu, the first country of transit, let's say germany or ukraine or other eu countries could not -- they could not dictate you may not pass this on without my permission to another country. what it allowed it to do is a minute a gas comes and it is eu gas and can be transferred further. we talked about reversing the flows from poland to hungary from slovakia into ukraine. that would not have been possible in 2000 nine because of the regulatory structure that was in place. i working with europe to get the regulatory structure there, making some investments and getting them to make investments in infrastructure, they are less reliant today. as russia will continue to be a supplier into europe emma there is more we can do together to make sure that that reliance is diminished and quite significantly. fors it a pipe dream americans who see themselves in anything like the near future europeng natural gas to and would that have any effect on our domestic market or do we have so much that it would ,imply mean a new market trades reduction in the investments if we were able to
back to the history books and what things were like in germany before world world war with the sense of them being a rising power but with the grievance that they would soon be into position to correct in some way. now that doesn't mean conflict is inevitable but the decisions over the maritime disputes you felt the chance of to improve. >> the trip i took in march was my 9th trip there. and it was a great quote that i would like to point out from a debate from two people of letters. i will not go into their names. they were arguing about china and one was living there for a couple years and there other returned. and the guy who had not said the guy who lived there was too close to china and the guy responded surely there is a medium between never -- living in china versus never being there at all. that guy had never been there at all. i can tell you every time i go i learn how much i don't know and how much is changing in china. i would be concerned about china's economic rise if it doesn't happen. and that is because the imperative i think from the comm commonnist party is if they
germany. so named because it's halfway to german street as the crow flies. that's what i call erudition. it's a beautiful country, they say. beautiful it may be, but it's not a patch on poland. ah, gentlemen, there'll always be a poland. otherwise, there wouldn't be any poles. [singing] ♪ there'll always be a poland and poland shall be free ♪ ♪ if poland means as much to you ♪ ♪ as poland means to me [music] there'll always be a poland? when jarry wrote the play, he would have scarcely have known that song or the sound of winston churchill's voice in world war ii. they are deliberate anachronisms added by this director. ubu roi has been popular with directors who enjoy adding their own mad touches to each production and who try to keep in the spirit of irreverence in ways which will mean the most to each new audience. since ubu, 20th-century writers have used similar techniques to emphasize modern chaos. in the plays of o'neill, ionesco, weiss and beckett, man has been depicted as ape, rhinoceros, asylum inmate and resident of a garbage can. expressionistic theater, as in ubu,
back to the history books and what things were like in germany before world war i. of germany being a rising power but with historical grievances that they would soon be in a position to correct in some way. that does not mean conflict is inevitable. the tensions over the various maritime disputes and the other you really felt the potential for increasing amounts of conflict. >> you have been following this for a long time, your thoughts? >> the trip i took in march was my night trip to china between the u.s. china working group. it was a great quote i like to point out from a debate that took place between two people of letters well known in the d c area. they were arguing about china, one had been living there for a couple years and returned and the other had not. the guy who had not said the guy who had been there was too close to china. and he could not be objective about his views and the guy responded by saying surely there is a happy medium between having lived in china and having never been there at all. that put the guy in his place, he had never been there at all. i don't
concerning indiana during a recent trade mission to germany. recently you criticized the way president obama has been handling ukraine, and you offered this suggestion. take a look. >> the continued instability in the middle east and with putin's suppression in ukraine, i believe we must take immediate steps to strengthen our mutual security by deploying a robust muscle defense in all of europe. >> why is the governor of i wanted i understand hoosiers have had a longstanding interest in issues affecting the nation at home and abroad, and i'm no different than that. when i was there, i thought it was important to speak about what i believe would be the right response to russian aggression in ukraine. i'm pleased to hear there's more sanctions maybe coming tomorrow. the truth of the matter is i think we need less talk and more deeds, and by passing and moving rapidly to pass the trans-atlantic trade partnership and, frankly, by deploying a robust missile shield throughout europe, including in poland and the czech republic that was off line in 2009 by this administration i think would send a ve
from germany said there had been no wrong treatment. >> i can tell you that the work the word of is a -- the mayor is a word of honor. we have not been touched, and we have been treated as the maximum extent, which is possible, under thie circumstances. >> schneider rejected allegations the inspectors were nato spies, saying that they were in ukraine on a diplomatic mission. mayor hasppointed said the observers might be released in exchange for jailed activists. we understand that the soldiers are hostages of the situation. three members of ukraine's security service have been captured. the armed insurgents claim they are on a mission to save the latest of the pro-russian force. they, too, were presented to the press but only to russian journalists. is seeking then release of all captives. beenr correspondent has covering events and joins us on the line. wasswedish observer released for medical reasons but the separatists are not budging. you were there today. what is your take? do you think they go she =- --do you think negotiators will be able to free the others? >> it is no
trade mission to germany, recently you criticized the way president obama has been handling ukraine. and you offered this suggestion. take a look. >> but to continued instability in the middle east and with putin's aggression in ukraine, i believe we must take immediate steps to strengthen our mutual security by deploying a robust missile defense in all of europe. >> why is the governor of indiana talking about missile defense and not to get too deeply into it, but how do you think setting up a missile defense in the czech republic or poland is going to stop putin who is not involved with missiles but is talking about sending tanks and airplanes over the border or at least threatening to send those over the border into eastern ukraine? how does missile defense help? >> well, first, i was in germany promoting the state of indiana. we have more than 12,000 hoosiers employed by german companies. and more to come. and hoosiers have had a long standing interest in issues affecting the nation at home and abroad. i'm no different than that. but when i was there, i thought it was important
in a displaced persons camp in germany soon after the end of world war ii. her family came to canada as refugees four years later. besides the distinguished legal credentials she has a degree from the royal conservatory of music in piano. justice abella. [applause] >> next the honorable dorit. she was president of the supreme court of israel. she served in the capacity for six years, the first woman in that position. she was recognized among many other things for her focus on protecting civil rights and human rights, women, and socially vulnerable immigrant workers and emphasized the importance of judicial review of activities of the executive branch of israel's government. her service as president of the supreme court followed 10 years as justice of that court. prior to this she served as a district attorney, director and deputy in the state attorney's office and as the state attorney of israel. the first woman in that position. she was born in tel aviv. justice dorit benish. [applause] >> and third, someone we know very well, the honorable ruth bader ginsberg, associate justice of the united s
of the dignitaries from southern germany, which would be very catholic. you've also got parts of england, ireland, all of those countries. of course, latin america. the gentleman standing behind pope francis is archbishop gainsfind. he was the assistant to pope benedict as well and elevated to archbishop. now he's the assistant to pope francis, and so when you see pope francis at a public event, you'll see archbishop gainsfind. if you see pope benedict at an event, which i did in january, archbishop gainsfind is there. he's the go-between. once you know him, you know both popes. >> this ceremony got started at 10:00 local time and lasted two hours there. pope francis is going down and doing what he's doing, shaking every day people's hands. when he became pope, wearing the wooden cross. what sticks out to you in the ceremony today as you've been watching the last couple hours? >> what sticks out to me is how formal it is. pope francis is keeping this warm right now. i don't think we'll see him do any selfies today. i don't think that's part of the program. but i do think you'll see, what you won'
and i remember seeing him when i was a soldier serving in germany. and i stood in ankle-deep mud taking pictures of him for the newspaper for the eighth army infantry division, and i was astounded and enthralled with his deliverance. he was so, so much a man of the people. >> yeah. there was something remarkable about seeing pope john paul ii in person. and you could make the argument he was live and in person by more people around the world than any human being in history. his travels across the globe, he was someone who a lot of people came to see and flocked to see. and there was always this sort of gravitas about him. one of the times i got to see him was actually at the bee at occasion of pope john xxiii. and what was remarkable, there is something about john paul ii, and that something, i think, is what's being recognized tomorrow in both of these men. they're not being made saints because of their accomplishments as pope or because of the things they wrote or said. they're being cannonized, because the church recognizes what is already the case. that these were holy men, and that
's one in germany. there's only two really that would be available. >> thank you so much for your time. appreciate that. >> all right. >>> a teenager was stabbed to death in the stairwell of her high school on prom day. the stunned student body and police. they all want to know why. all stations come over to mission a for a final go. this is for real this time. step seven point two one two. verify and lock. command is locked. five seconds. three, two, one. standing by for capture. the most innovative software on the planet... dragon is captured. is connecting today's leading companies to places beyond it. siemens. answers. >>> investigators in connecticut are trying to figure out the motive behind a deadly attack on a 16-year-old honors student. it happened yesterday at a school in milford. just about 20 miles away from newtown. police say a classmate slashed maren sanchez to death in a school stairwell. this is heartbreaking. what happened? >> she was a very popular girl. we're hearing a lot on social media from her friends and family. at about 7:00 a.m. this all unfolded in the stair
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)